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Browse the Botanical Definitions

In addition to searching through the individual botanical definitions you may now benefit also from browsing the extensive information gleaned through our research. This list has been compiled in alphabetic order according to the genus or species..

To browse the definitions please click on one of the buttons below to see the section under that letter. In some cases there may be no words under a particular letter.

 

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Definitions
lactiflora is derived from Latin lacti- (milk) and -flora (flowered) meaning 'with milky flowers'. [See Paeonia lactiflora.]

Lactuca [genus name] is derived from Latin lactis (milky plant sap) and is a Latin name for plants in this (lettuce) genus. [See Lactuca.]

lactuca is derived from Latin lactis (milky plant sap). [See Ulva lactuca.]

laevigata is derived from Latin levis (smooth) meaning 'smooth or polished'. [See Carex laevigata, Celtis laevigata, Corynocarpus laevigata, Crataegus laevigata, Rosa laevigata.]

laevigatus is derived from Latin levis (smooth) meaning 'smooth or polished'. [See Corynocarpus laevigatus.]

Lagenaria [genus name] is derived from Greek lageno- (flagon, flask) with reference to the fruit's most familiar shape. [See Lagenaria.]

lambertiana commemorates an English botanist, Aylmer Bourke Lambert (1761-1842) who has been described as a patron of botany. His friends, from his teens, included many leading botanists, especially the English botanist, Sir James Edward Smith (1759-1828). He developed over his lifetime a large and diverse herbarium (consisting of specimens personally collected, received from donors or obtained in purchased lots) which he made available to his peers (from all over the world) but which, because of their never organised nature, became split up and distributed all over the world after his death. Lambert also collected plants which he grew on his Wiltshire estate in his gardens and greenhouses, and he created a large library. He was a founder Fellow of the Linnean Society (to which he contributed a few papers, and of which he became a vice-president in1796), a Fellow of the Royal Society from 1791 (of which he became a Council Member in 1810), and he was also a member of the Society of Antiquaries of London (reflecting his interest in other aspects of natural history). With guidance especially from the English botanists, Sir Joseph Banks (1744-1820) and Sir James Edward Smith, and in partial collaboration with not least the English botanist, David Don (1799-1841) his publications included A Description of the Genus Cinchona, and A Description of the Genus Pinus. [See Pinus lambertiana.]

Laminaria [genus name] is derived from Latin lamina (blade, thin plate).

Gum extracted from seaweeds in this genus is used by the food industry in salad dressings, processed cheese and other dairy products, ice cream and various puddings. [See Laminaria.]

Lamium [genus name] is derived from Greek laimo- (throat) with reference to the shape of the flowers, and is a classical Latin name for these plants.

The dead nettles (in the form of a distillation of the flowers) acquired a name for being able to lift the spirits. [See Lamium.]

Lampranthus [genus name] is derived from Greek lampro- (bright, shining, glossy) and antho- (flower) components. [See Lampranthus.]


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