at plantlives.com  
  

Company Logo
 

News

OUT NOW
1st formal Edition of the CD of Plant Biographies (or Plant's Eye View of the Planet and Man). About 1000 extra pages which include a dramatic expansion of R genera plus other additions and changes.

 

Browse the Botanical Definitions

In addition to searching through the individual botanical definitions you may now benefit also from browsing the extensive information gleaned through our research. This list has been compiled in alphabetic order according to the genus or species..

To browse the definitions please click on one of the buttons below to see the section under that letter. In some cases there may be no words under a particular letter.

 

A B C D E F G H I J K L M
N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

There are 127 records that match.

 

Definitions
Lysichiton [genus name] is derived from Greek lysi- (unfasten, release, loosen) and -chiton (tunic) components with reference to the open protective leaf-like spathe which is released or shed from the fleshy fruit spike (spadix) when the fruit ripen. [See Lysichiton.]

Lysimachia [genus name] is derived for some authorities from Greek luo (to lose) and mache (strife) components. For others it commemorates the King of Thrace, Lysimachus (c. 360-281 BC). He ruled his kingdom in about 300 BC and was reputed to have been the first to discover the plant's soothing qualities, not least by using it to pacify a bull. The name Lysimachus in Greek means 'ending strife'. He served as a courageous officer under Alexander the Great (356-323 BC) who, upon his death, left Thrace and the Gallipoli Peninsula under Lysimachus' governorship. He expanded his kingdom and spent much of his active life fending off invaders until eventually he died in the Battle of Corupedium. [See Lysimachia.]

Lythrum [genus name] is derived from Greek lythron (blood) with reference to the colour of the flowers. [See Lythrum.]

lycopersicum is derived from the genus name Lycopersicon which is based on the Greek words lyco- (wolf) and Latin persica (peach) components, and is a Greek name for a different plant (probably Egyptian). [See Solanum lycopersicum.]

lyallii commemorates a Scottish naval surgeon and naturalist, Dr. David Lyall (1817-1895) who made many extensive plant collections during his career. He served in the British Royal Navy from 1839 to 1873 during which time he was a member of expeditions as far flung as the Antarctic and the Arctic. It was in the mid-1800s, when he served as surgeon and naturalist on board HMS Acheron (for the expedition which was tasked with carrying out a survey of the New Zealand coastline) that he discovered the mountain lily. Both a plant genus and several individual plant species honour the Scotsman, who was elected a Fellow of the Linnean Society in 1862. [See Ranunculus lyallii.]

longiflora is derived from Latin longi- (long) and -flora (flowered) components. [See Rothmannia longiflora.]

longifolius is made up of Latin longi- (long) and -folia (leaved) components. [See Rumex longifolius.]


Previous Page 13 of 13

 
 

ALL material is subject to Copyright.
Text © 1991-2013 Sue Eland
(See Terms and Conditions under Contact and About Us.)
Site by Bath IT