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Browse the Botanical Definitions

In addition to searching through the individual botanical definitions you may now benefit also from browsing the extensive information gleaned through our research. This list has been compiled in alphabetic order according to the genus or species..

To browse the definitions please click on one of the buttons below to see the section under that letter. In some cases there may be no words under a particular letter.

 

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Definitions
Cedronella [genus name] is derived from Greek kedros (cedar).

The 1st Century natural historian Pliny the Elder (23-79) called it ‘cedar’ because its fragrance according to some authorities is similar. [See Cedronella.]

Ceiba [genus name] is a corruption of a South American name for the kapok tree (Ceiba pentandra) in the past placed by botanists in the Bombax genus. [See Ceiba.]

ceiba is a corruption of a South American name for the kapok tree (Ceiba pentandra) once included in the Bombax genus. [See Bombax ceiba.]

Celastrus [genus name] is derived from Greek kelastros (evergreen tree, especially false olive Phillyrea latifolia). [See Celastrus.]

Celosia [genus name] is derived from Greek keleos (burning) with reference to the brilliant colour of flowers and often flame-shaped flower-spike in this genus. [See Celosia.]

Celtis [genus name] is an ancient Greek name for a different tree to those in this genus. [See Celtis.]

cembra is an Italian name for this species. [See Pinus cembra.]

Cenchrus [genus name] is derived from Greek kegchros (millet). [See Cenchrus.]

Centaurea [genus name] is derived from the name of a plant in Greek mythology (kentaurion or centaureum) in which Chiron, one of the half-man half-horse centaurs (kentauros), is said to have used knapweed (species from this Centaurea genus) to heal a wound on his foot.

All the knapweed species are avoided by cattle. [See Centaurea.]

centifolia is derived from Latin centi- (hundred) and -folia (leaved) components meaning 'many leaved or with a hundred leaves or petals'. [See Rosa x centifolia.]


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