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Browse the Botanical Definitions

In addition to searching through the individual botanical definitions you may now benefit also from browsing the extensive information gleaned through our research. This list has been compiled in alphabetic order according to the genus or species..

To browse the definitions please click on one of the buttons below to see the section under that letter. In some cases there may be no words under a particular letter.

 

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Definitions
Pinguicula [genus name] is derived from Latin pinguis (fat) with reference to the greasy-looking leaves. [See Pinguicula.]

pinnatifolia is derived from pinnata (a feathery arrangement of leaflets on each side of the common stalk) and Latin -folia (leaved) components meaning 'with leaves in feathery arrangements'. [See Hicksbeachia pinnatifolia.]

pinnatum is a botanical reference to the leaf-shape meaning 'a feathery arrangement of leaflets on each side of the common stalk'. [See Platymiscium pinnatum.]

Piper [genus name] is derived from a Greek name peperi that itself comes from Sanskrit pippali or, some say, Bengalese pippul, and is a classical Latin name. [See Piper.]

Piscidia [genus name] is derived from Latin piscis (fish) and caedo (kill, cut down, strike, beat) components with reference to the use as fish poison.

Members of this family (Leguminosae) absorb nitrogen from the air. Through the bacterial nodules on their deep growing roots, they will introduce nitrogen to the soil (and aerate it), to the benefit of neighbouring plants and any following them in the same soil. [See Piscidia.]

pisifera is derived from Latin pisum (pea) and -fer (bearing, carrying) components. [See Chamaecyparis pisifera.]

Pistacia [genus name] is derived from Greek pistake (pistachio) which itself comes from a Persian name. [See Pistacia.]

Pistia [genus name] is derived from Greek pistos (water) with reference to an aquatic environment. [See Pistia.]

Pithecellobium [genus name] is derived from Greek pitheco- (monkey, ape) and ellobion (ear-ring) components.

Initially Pithecellobium was spelt Pithecollobium.

Members of this family (Leguminosae) absorb nitrogen from the air. Through the bacterial nodules on their deep growing roots they will introduce nitrogen to the soil (and aerate it) to the benefit of neighbouring plants and any following them in the same soil. [See Pithecellobium.]

Pittosporum [genus name] is derived from Greek pitta (pitch, tar) and sporo- (seed) components with reference to the sticky resin in which the seeds are embedded. [See Pittosporum.]


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