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Browse the Botanical Definitions

In addition to searching through the individual botanical definitions you may now benefit also from browsing the extensive information gleaned through our research. This list has been compiled in alphabetic order according to the genus or species..

To browse the definitions please click on one of the buttons below to see the section under that letter. In some cases there may be no words under a particular letter.

 

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Definitions
Chamaedorea [genus name] is derived from Greek chamae- (dwarf, on the ground, low-growing) and doro- (gift) components with reference to the easily accessible fruit. [See Chamaedorea.]

chamaedrys is derived from Greek chamae- (dwarf, on the ground, low-growing) and drys (oak) components. [See Teucrium chamaedrys, Veronica chamaedrys.]

Chamaelirium [genus name] is derived from Greek chamae- (dwarf, on the ground, low-growing) and lirion (lily) components. [See Chamaelirium.]

chamaemorus is derived from Greek chamai (low-growing) and Latin morus (black mulberry, Morus nigra) components with reference to mulberry-like fruit on a low-growing plant. [See Rubus chamaemorus.]

chamaepitys is made up of Greek chamae- (dwarf, on the ground, low-growing) and pitys (pine) components meaning 'dwarf pine'. [See Ajuga chamaepitys.]

Chamaerops [genus name] is derived from Greek chamae- (dwarf, on the ground, low-growing) and rhops (bush) components. [See Chamaerops.]

Chamomilla [genus name] is derived from Greek chamae- (dwarf, on the ground, low-growing). This is said to have been the name chosen by the celebrated 1st Century Greek physician, Pedanius Dioscorides, for a plant with an apple-like smell. [See ... .]

champaca is a corruption of local Himalayan names for the plant. [See Magnolia champaca.]

charantia is a name for this particular species (Momordica charantia) used before the Swedish botanist, Carolus Linnaeus (1707-1778) so named it. [See Momordica charantia.]

Chasmanthium [genus name] is derived from Greek chasme (gaping) and antho- (flower) components meaning 'the flower opens flat ie. it is not tubular'. [See Chasmanthium.]


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