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Browse the Botanical Definitions

In addition to searching through the individual botanical definitions you may now benefit also from browsing the extensive information gleaned through our research. This list has been compiled in alphabetic order according to the genus or species..

To browse the definitions please click on one of the buttons below to see the section under that letter. In some cases there may be no words under a particular letter.

 

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Definitions
subhirsutum is derived from Latin sub- (somewhat, almost, rather, slightly, partially, under, etc.) and hirsutum (shaggy, rough) components meaning 'somewhat hairy'. [See Allium subhirsutum.]

subhirtella is derived from Latin sub- (somewhat, almost, rather, slightly, partially, under, etc.) and hirta (shaggy, rough, hairy, prickly) meaning 'somewhat hairy'. [See Prunus subhirtella.]

submersum means 'partially submerged or under water'. [See Ceratophyllum submersum.]

submollis is derived from Latin sub- (somewhat, almost, rather, slightly, partially, under, etc.) and mollis (soft) meaning 'somewhat softly hairy or velvety tenderness'. [See Crataegus submollis.]

subulata is derived from Latin subula (shoemaker's awl) meaning 'awl-shaped'. [See Phlox subulata.]

suecica means 'of or from Sweden'. [See Cornus suecica, Silene suecica.]

superba is Latin (haughty, exalted, proud) meaning 'superb, splendid, brilliant or magnificent'. [See Gloriosa superba, Gustavia superba.]

superbum is Latin (haughty, exalted, proud) meaning 'superb, splendid, brilliant or magnificent'. [See Lilium superbum.]

suspensa is derived from Latin suspendo (to hang up) meaning 'hanging'. [See Forsythia suspensa.]

Swertia [genus name] commemorates a Dutch florist, author and artist, Emmanuel Sweert (1552-1612), who was prefect of the Prague gardens of Rudolph II. He published his Florilegium (1612-1614) and it is still sought after today. At the time however it served as a catalogue of plants from his gardens that were being offered for sale at fairs in Frankfurt and Amsterdam. [See Swertia.]


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