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Browse the Botanical Definitions

In addition to searching through the individual botanical definitions you may now benefit also from browsing the extensive information gleaned through our research. This list has been compiled in alphabetic order according to the genus or species..

To browse the definitions please click on one of the buttons below to see the section under that letter. In some cases there may be no words under a particular letter.

 

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Definitions
Maianthemum [genus name] is derived from Greek maios (the month of May) and -anthemon (blossom) components with reference to the plants' flowering time. [See Maianthemum.]

majorana is derived from its Greek name amarakus and is an old name for this species. [See Origanum majorana.]

majus is derived from Latin maior (greater) meaning 'greater, bigger or larger'. [See Ammi majus, Antirrhinum majus, Chelidonium majus, Conopodium majus, Tropaeolum majus.]

malabarica means 'of or from the Malabar coast (south-western India)'. [See Myristica malabarica.]

malabathricum means 'of or from the Malabar coast (south-western India)'. [See Melastoma malabathricum.]

maldivica means 'of or from the Maldives, a republican archipelago of over 1200 islands in the Indian Ocean, south-west of Sri Lanka'. [See Lodoicea maldivica.]

maliformis is derived from Latin malum (apple) and forma (shape) components meaning 'apple-shaped'. [See Passiflora maliformis.]

Mallotus [genus name] is derived from Greek mallo- (woolly). [See Mallotus.]

Malpighia [genus name] commemorates an Italian physician, philosopher, anatomist and microscopist, Marcello Malpighi (1628-1694). He was a professor of medicine at Bologna University briefly from 1656, professor of theoretical medicine at Pisa from 1658-1662, and a professor at Messina from 1662-1666 after which he returned as professor to Bologna from 1666-1691. Then in 1691, with failing health, he became chief physician to Pope Innocent XII. Malpighi carried out a considerable amount of research and discovered much about the structure of animals and plants, especially aided by his pioneering use of the microscope (he was the first to use it in anatomical studies). It has been noted that he would open animals (not human) alive and this practice enabled him to make observations that might not have been possible then by other methods. Throughout his life his views often conflicted with centuries-held prevailing ideas and attracted much controversy amongst his peers, and some authorities note that in 1684 his villa was burnt, and his equipment and papers were destroyed. Today still the names of a number of anatomical structures embrace his name. In 1668 he became the first Italian to become a Fellow of The Royal Society in London. His published works include De Pulmonibus, De viscerum structura exercitatio, and Anatomia Plantarum. [See Malpighia.]

Malva [genus name] is derived from Greek malaco- (soft, soothing) component with reference to the gooey substance yielded by the seeds, and is a classical Latin name for 'mallow' (Malva sylvestris). [See Malva.]


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