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Browse the Botanical Definitions

In addition to searching through the individual botanical definitions you may now benefit also from browsing the extensive information gleaned through our research. This list has been compiled in alphabetic order according to the genus or species..

To browse the definitions please click on one of the buttons below to see the section under that letter. In some cases there may be no words under a particular letter.

 

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Definitions
Sanicula [genus name] is derived from Latin sanus (healthy, sound). [See Sanicula.]

santalinus is derived from the genus name Santalum meaning 'like plants in that (sandalwood) genus'. [See Pterocarpus santalinus.]

Santalum [genus name] is a corruption of Greek sanatalon (sandalwood tree) itself (through sandanon) derived from Sanskrit chandana (fragrant). [See Santalum.]

Santolina [genus name] is derived from an old Latin name for one of the species sanctum linum (holy flax). [See Santolina.]

sapida is derived from Latin sapio (to taste, have a flavour) meaning 'pleasant tasting'. [See Blighia sapida, Rhopalostylis sapida.]

sapota (also spelt zapota) is derived from tzapotl an Aztec name used for several species that have sweet-tasting, rounded fruit with large seeds. [See Pouteria sapota.]

sarniensis means 'of or from the island of Guernsey (in the Channel Islands) which was once known as Sarnia'. [See Nerine sarniensis.]

sarothrae is derived from Greek saro- (broom). [See Gutierrezia sarothrae.]

Sarracenia [genus name] commemorates a French naturalist and physician, Michel Sarrazin (1659-1734), who from 1865 lived in Quebec as King's physician in the capital of 'New France' (a title that the North American area occupied by French settlers would lose in 1763 when it was ceded to Britain). He practised medicine, collected and studied plants (cataloguing the specimens systematically), as well as minerals and animals (dissecting the latter). Sarrazin sent specimens and results of any tests he had carried out to France and corresponded in particular with the French botanist, Joseph Pitton de Tournefort (1656-1708). [See Sarracenia.]

Sassafras [genus name] is for some authorities a corruption developed by French settlers (in the Florida area of southern North America from a local American Indian name, and for others it is derived from Spanish salsafras with reference to the root bark's past medicinal uses. [See Sassafras.]


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