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Browse the Botanical Definitions

In addition to searching through the individual botanical definitions you may now benefit also from browsing the extensive information gleaned through our research. This list has been compiled in alphabetic order according to the genus or species..

To browse the definitions please click on one of the buttons below to see the section under that letter. In some cases there may be no words under a particular letter.

 

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Definitions
Oplopanax [genus name] is derived from Greek hoplon (weapon) and the genus name Panax (ginseng) components with reference to the horrendous prickles. [See Oplopanax.]

opulus was a Latin name for a kind of maple. [See Viburnum opulus.]

orbiculare is derived from Latin orbiculatus (round) meaning 'disc-shaped, or round and flat'. [See Phyteuma orbiculare.]

orbiculatus is Latin (round) meaning 'disc-shaped, or round and flat'. [See Celastrus orbiculatus.]

Oreopteris [genus name] is derived from Greek oro- (mountain) and pteri- (fern, feather) components with reference to habitat. [See Oreopteris.]

orientale means 'of or from the East'. [See Papaver orientale.]

orientalis means 'of or from the East'. [See Helleborus orientalis, Hyacinthus orientalis, Liquidambar orientalis, Persicaria orientalis, Picea orientalis, Platanus orientalis, Platycladus orientalis, Sigesbeckia orientalis.]

Origanum [genus name] is derived from Greek oro- (mountain) and gano- (joy, bright) components and is a classical Greek name for these plants.

Oregano and marjoram of which there are many varieties are of the same Origanum genus. For culinary purposes they are virtually interchangeable but oregano when it has been grown in southern Europe has a much stronger, more peppery taste and needs to be used sparingly.

Medicinally, oregano (Origanum vulgare)/marjoram (Origanum majorana) species have been used by the ancient Greek and Roman and, later, western European herbalists as well for treating a wide range of problems such as bruises, stiff joints and muscles, rheumatism, painful swellings, convulsions and fluid retention, and also for easing toothache and earache, and even as a hair restorer. In addition the species are also believed to provide an antidote for poisoning from henbane (Hyoscyamus niger), the opium poppy (Papaver somniferum) and hemlock (Conium maculatum).

Despite commercial cultivation in various parts of the world most supplies are still obtained from the wild in the Mediterranean regions, particularly from southern Italy. [See Origanum.]

Ornithogalum [genus name] is for some authorities derived from Greek ornitho- (bird) and galacto- (milk) components with reference to an expression used widely in ancient Greece 'bird's milk' to describe something miraculous. For others it is derived from an ancient Greek or Latin name for a bulbous plant that bears white flowers ornithogale. [See Ornithogalum.]

Orobanche [genus name] is derived from Greek orobos (a kind of vetch) and -anche (strangle) components with reference to the plants' parasitic nature.

The different species thrive on the roots of various plants. [See Orobanche.]


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