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Browse the Botanical Definitions

In addition to searching through the individual botanical definitions you may now benefit also from browsing the extensive information gleaned through our research. This list has been compiled in alphabetic order according to the genus or species..

To browse the definitions please click on one of the buttons below to see the section under that letter. In some cases there may be no words under a particular letter.

 

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Definitions
serrulata is derived from Latin serrula (little saw) meaning 'with small serrated or saw-like teeth'. [See Photinia serrulata, Prunus serrulata.]

Sesamum [genus name] is a corruption of Greek sesamon (sesame) which itself is derived from a Semitic name. [See Sesamum.]

sessilifolia is derived from Latin sessilis (seated, stalkless) and -folia (leaved) components meaning 'with stalkless leaves'. [See Diervilla sessilifolia, Uvularia sessilifolia.]

Sesuvium [genus name] is of uncertain origin. Some authorities note Caesar's mention of the Sesuvii tribe (in particular in Book II of his Gallic Wars) in coastal north-western Gaul although a reason for such an attribution is not apparent. [See Sesuvium.]

setacea is derived from Latin saeta (bristle, stiff hair) meaning 'bristled'. [See Deschampsia setacea.]

setaceum is derived from Latin saeta (bristle, stiff hair) meaning 'bristled'. [See Pennisetum setaceum.]

Setaria [genus name] is derived from Latin saeta (bristle, stiff hair) with reference to the bristly spikelets. [See Setaria.]

setiferum is derived from Latin saeta (bristle, stiff hair) and -fer (bearing, carrying) components means 'bearing bristles'. [See Polystichum setiferum.]

setigera is derived from Latin saeta (bristle, stiff hair) meaning 'bristly'. [See Rosa setigera.]

sexangulare is derived from Latin sex (six) and anguli- (angle, corner) components meaning 'with six angles'. [See Sedum sexangulare.]


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