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Browse the Botanical Definitions

In addition to searching through the individual botanical definitions you may now benefit also from browsing the extensive information gleaned through our research. This list has been compiled in alphabetic order according to the genus or species..

To browse the definitions please click on one of the buttons below to see the section under that letter. In some cases there may be no words under a particular letter.

 

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Definitions
perpusillus is a Latin word meaning 'very small, very little'. [See Ornithopus perpusillus.]

persica means 'of or from Persia (Iran)'. [See Parrotia persica, Prunus persica, Prunus persica var. nectarina.]

Persicaria [genus name] is derived from Latin persica (peach) with reference to the leaf-shape and is a medieval name for a knotweed. [See Persicaria.]

perutile is Latin (very useful). [See Allium cepa var. perutile.]

pes-caprae is derived from Latin -pes (foot) and capri- (goat, she-goat) components meaning 'like a goat's foot'. [See Oxalis pes-caprae.]

Petasites [genus name] is derived from Latin petasi ( broad-brimmed hat, sunshade) with reference to the large leaves. [See Petasites.]

petiolaris means 'with a leaf stalk, or with a particularly long leaf stalk'. [See Helianthus petiolaris.]

petiolata means 'with a leaf stalk, or with a particularly long leaf stalk'. [See Alliaria petiolata.]

Petrea [genus name] commemorates a patron of botany and horticulture, Robert James Petre, 8th Baron Petre (1714-1743), who became interested in botany in his youth. During his teens he met both the first Cambridge professor of botany, John Martyn (1699-1768) and the Keeper of the Chelsea Physic Garden, Philip Miller (1691-1771). In due course he formed a friendship with Peter Collinson (1694-1768), who imported plants and seeds from North America (particularly from John Bartram 1699-1777) and corresponded with other plant collectors out there. Petre designed, planned and planted his gardens and parks on his Thorndon estate with many exotic trees and shrubs, and in 1736 commissioned Philip Miller (1691-1771) to catalogue all the plants. Some of the Thorndon plants were especially unusual as for instance banana (Musa acuminata) which he grew successfully and he is said to have been sending the fruit to Sir Hans Sloane (1660-1753) by 1739. By 1742 he had added 40,000 American trees to the property. After his death the Woburn estate acquired his American tree collection at auction. He was a Fellow of the Royal Society. [See Petrea.]

Petrorhagia [genus name] is derived from Greek petro- (rock) and rhagado- (chink, rent, crack) or rhegnymi (break asunder) components with reference to the species' habit of growing in cracks in rocks. [See Petrorhagia.]


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