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Browse the Botanical Definitions

In addition to searching through the individual botanical definitions you may now benefit also from browsing the extensive information gleaned through our research. This list has been compiled in alphabetic order according to the genus or species..

To browse the definitions please click on one of the buttons below to see the section under that letter. In some cases there may be no words under a particular letter.

 

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Definitions
Rumohra [genus name] comemorates a German art historian, botanical patron and writer, Karl Friedrich von Rumohr (1785-1843). Born into a wealthy family, the art world absorbed most of his life. But in his last ten or so years he concentrated increasingly on cookery and agricultural studies. [See Rumohra.]

Ruppia [genus name] is said to honour Heinrich Bernhard Rupp or Ruppius (1688-1719), a German botanist who was born in Jena and studied there. He published the first edition of his Flora Jenensis in 1718, followed by the second edition in 1726. A third edition, prepared by the Swiss physician, naturalist and statesman, Albrecht von Haller (1709-1777) was published in 1745.

It should be noted that botanists still debate the taxonomy in this genus. Many would appear to believe for example that Ruppia cirrhosa and Ruppia maritima are one and the same species and that the variations between them arise from environmental factors. [See Ruppia.]

Ruprechtia [genus name] commemorates an Austro-Bohemian physician and botanist, Franz Josef (Ivanovich) Ruprecht (1814-1870) who spent much of his life in St. Petersburg, Russia. He became curator at the Russian Academy of Sciences in 1839 and a member there in 1848 after he had acquired Russian citizenship. From 1851-1855 he was an assistant director at the Imperial Botanic Garden (St. Petersburg) and director of its botanical museum from 1855-1870. He travelled widely in Russia (which at the time included Alaska) collecting plants, including new ones, which were the basis of several of his publications. An expedition from 1847-1848 yielded his Flora boreali-uralensis published in 1854. Another notable work was Flora Ingrica (St. Petersburg area) published in 1860. [See Ruprechtia.]


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